Raj Thakre trumpet of Bihari migrant

Mar 11, 2007

In recent 1st anniversary function, Raj Thakre said to Bihari migrant “Behave correctly”.
He seemed very aggressive about migrant worker from north India.
I will only say instead of raising such voice he should do something about poor in south Maharashtra (Vdharva region). He and their parent party must not distract people attention from their failure in tackling the real issue. He with his parent party is in Municipal Corporation from last ten years. He just one year before parted way from Shiv Sena. So he and their parent party were in a position to do something for them or at least raise voice for them.

In Vidarbha region thousands of farmers have committed suicide and still doing so. Vidarbha region are demanding separate state. Is that the reason for not giving head there? If yes, may be they also become migrant in eye of Raj Thakre and Shiv Sena.

Just few months back in Municipal election they have asked for votes from all section including Hindi speaking voters. Now after only two months they are behaving like this.

Raj Thakre must get lesson from Nitish Kumar (Current Bihar Chief Minister), who after becoming CM said, “I will work under constitution, and not work against any one due to personal reason. (They are referring to past Bihar CM, who is famous for mitigating the image of Bihari people. If Nitish Kumar have done bad or tried to do some bad then probably people of Bihar has also supported them against past Bihar CM).

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25 Comments

  1. Friend, Being a marathi i feel ashamed bcz of behavior of marathi Terrorist(Raj Thakre). I m really shocked and surprise why the MHS Gov. is not taking any action against him.

    We should kick out raj thakre from Maharashtra 1st.

    ReplyDelete
  2. If you ask a average maharashtrians who doesn't look much beyond mumbai an maharashtra, he would say what raj tahckrey is doing was required some day. Its little too much now. Now this could be reacted with different political techniques but bottomline is mumbai is becoming worst for its locals.
    But average mumbaikar don't want riots and that could be one reason he might not support thackrey's execution style but he definately supports the concern.

    I found these links on of the sites, looks like majority of mumbaikars out here, very interesting comments.

    http://www.marathikatta.com/Society/Number_of_outsiders_in_Mumbai_declining/

    http://www.marathikatta.com/Mumbai/In_Mumbai_north_Indians_attacked/

    ReplyDelete
  3. The person who wrote the first comment must be stupid i can say. lack of knowledge about maharashtra.
    Vidharbha never asked for seperate state.
    MNS should be in powers to work for vidharba.
    Media should get on to the street and ask the "JANTA" accept north indian for their comment rather than imposing their view on people.
    But i know media wont do it becouse they are full of north indians.
    Infact media is the "Gunda". They decide who is criminal and who is gentleman.
    Why dont they show us some peoples view on mumbai street.
    I do support Raj for pulling out the subject on stopping the influx of north indian on large quantity.
    Its good to have multi cultural city but with it you also invite crime like rape, mugging, vandalism, theft, assault, etc.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Friends ,
    i am from proper mumbai ,
    i can tell u the citizens in mumbai whether marathi or south indian or north indian nobody wants more load on mumbai resources here .
    The crowd here is increasing day by day. its getting hard 2 live peacefully (ask the people r in mumbai from some decades ago n from all communities ).
    i accept that that in our country everyone had right 2 stay , travell & live anywhere .

    But it is the responsibility of other state govts 2 create jobs for people.

    there r 45 lakhs of people r from up/bihar/other states. what these state govt r doing for development of their own state? if u cant do this u have no right 2 force mah govt 2 accept them?

    All states in india r created on basis of languge . So we had full right to demand respect for state language in our capital & nobody has right to deny it.

    I must tell u all people we mumbaikars(all communities) support raj thakre & previously shivsena too for fighting for us.

    finally its we who r suffering from overload & its clear nobody is looking for us .

    so think again ,
    i express & beg support to raj thakre & all those who r looking for our problems.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi All !
    well what Raj Thakre is doing is just which we can expect from Illitrate Person..He him self is not constant of his decision.There were days he had lot of respect for Amitab Bachan but now today if u see he is against Amitab. well that does not matter but yes what matter is a person constant decision .INDIA is for all and Mumbai is not a seperate country.As far as Govt Job are concerned i just as u if u have so much confidence on ur self the just compete with all INDIAN( BIHAR,BENGAL,ORISSA,SOUTH INDIANS) and prove ur worth.
    No Fight just as Justice.
    so just have suggetion to that INDIAN is one and ALL states are the part of india.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Dear,Friend
    In recent 1st anniversary function, Raj Thakre said to Bihari migrant “Behave

    correctly”.He seemed very aggressive about migrant worker from north India.
    I will only say instead of raising such voice he should do something about poor in

    south Maharashtra .
    Please visit For More Detail
    http://desidirectory.com/desi-indian-blogs/

    ReplyDelete
  7. Dr Heckle and Mr Pride
    Rajdeep Sardesai, Editor-in-Chief, CNN-IBN
    First Published: 22:31 IST(7/2/2008)
    Long before there was ‘monkey’, sorry, ‘maa ki...’, there was ‘bhaiya’. The 1979 Ranji game between Bombay and Delhi at the Wankhede stadium witnessed the repeated chants of ‘bhaiya’ every time Madan Lal ran in to bowl. Ironically, a year or two later, as Madan Lal bowled India to a famous win on the same ground against England, the abuse turned to celebration. In a sense, the contrast was typically Bombay: warm, embracing and cosmopolitan at one level, but unforgiving, narrow-minded, and parochial at another. Mumbai has always been a Jekyll and Hyde city with a fleeting memory span. Madan Lal realised it three decades ago. Now, Amitabh Bachchan is being confronted with the grim reality: a much-loved global superstar one day, targeted as a migrant from Uttar Pradesh the next.
    That Maharashtra Navnirman Sena leader Raj Thackeray has chosen to reveal the darker side of Mumbai in the last week should come as no surprise. For more than four decades now, Mumbai’s carefree, ‘bindaas’ spirit (best exemplified in Johnny Walker crooning on Marine Drive “Ae dil he mushkil’ in the 1950s) has wrestled with the forces of nativism and sectarian politics. In a city that prides itself on its comforting urbanism, violence and intimidation have always lurked in the shadows.
    Long before Raj discovered the north Indian as the ‘enemy within’, his uncle Bal Thackeray had already uncorked the genie of militant chauvinism onto Mumbai’s political landscape. If Raj targets the north Indian taxi driver from UP and Bihar today, 40 years ago his uncle made a mark by first attacking the shops and restaurants owned by South Indian migrants from Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. An opportunistic Thackeray Sr’s hate objects changed over the years. The Shiv Sena started off as an ‘anti-South Indian’ movement; then it took on the communists before settling on the Muslim as the ‘enemy’. If the initial years were designed to nurture the Sena as a ‘sons of the soil’ movement with a staunch Maharashtrian identity, the last 20 years have seen the Sena ‘graduate’ into the party of Hindutva politics, aimed at widening its political base beyond the local Marathi-speaking population. While evolving through its various avatars, one thing has remained unchanged: the Shiv Sena’s search for an enemy and a commitment to the politics of violence as a means to an end. Riots, bandhs and mass killings — the Sena cannot escape the charge of having Mumbai’s blood on its hands over four decades.
    To that extent, the nephew is only carrying forward the legacy of the uncle. Over four decades, Bal Thackeray has mastered the art of staying in the arclights by his seemingly outrageous rhetoric and open endorsement of violence. He has also, in the process, been built up as a larger-than-life figure; someone to be feared, reviled or admired, depending on your political preferences. Like his uncle, Raj, too, is a cartoonist, who has consciously modelled himself on the Sena supremo. The mannerisms, the sharp language, even the physical appearance, the similarities are uncanny. An ambitious, charismatic Raj, with one eye on next year’s polls, desperately wants to be like his uncle. But while Balasaheb remains a unique figure in Indian politics, Raj is in danger of being reduced to a caricature of the leader he hero-worships.
    Quite simply, Mumbai 2008 is not Bombay 1966 when the Shiv Sena was founded. In 1966, Maharashtra was still a young state, influenced by the linguistic agitation that had led to its formation. The sense of cultural pride in being a Maharashtrian was greater, as was the fear of the ‘outsider’, especially in Mumbai, a city which has been shaped by its capacity to attract people from all across the country. To that extent, the emergence of the Sena was seen by many Maharashtrians as a legitimate platform to express their grievances, especially the economic concerns stemming from increasing middle-class competition for jobs.
    Thackeray Sr became a ‘loudspeaker’ of popular grievances, someone ready to question and challenge the dominance of Mumbai’s non-Maharashtrian elites. Membership of a Sena shakha became a badge of honour, designed to compensate for the insecurity being felt in the hostile job environment.
    Forty years later, it is questionable whether the Maharashtrian middle-class feels the same sense of anger and alienation. Sure, there is a never-ending battle for Mumbai’s scarce resources, especially housing. But the ‘enemy’ isn’t so well-defined any longer. Comfortably ensconced in the new economy, the aspirations of the new generation of Maharashtrians, like most communities, are going well beyond clerical serfdom. How many middle-class Maharastrians see the UP-Bihari taxi driver as ‘competition’? how many maharashtrians actually feel threatened by the so-called ‘invasions’ of Bhojpuri culture? Ironically, Maharashtrian culture itself has almost willingly succumbed to the march of Bollywood, slowly destroying any sense of pride in tradition and language. As a result, while there is a core group — often of unemployed youth — who will be attracted to the Raj Thackeray style of machismo identity politics, the numbers aren’t large enough to make it a sustainable movement like the original Sena.
    There is also a critical demographic difference between the 60s and today. Bal Thackeray’s south Indian ‘lungiwallahs’ were barely 5-6 per cent of the city’s population, and hence were a real ‘minority’. By contrast, the 2001 census suggests that north Indian migrants comprise around 12-14 per cent of the population. The UP or Bihari migrant is no longer a marginal figure in Mumbai’s salad bowl; he is a crucial ingredient in the city’s ethos of economic interdependence.
    Politically, this has transformed Mumbai’s map. A Govinda, for example, would not have won a Lok Sabha seat from Mumbai without the staunch support of the north Indian community. The Congress-NCP alliance would not have won 19 of the city’s 34 assembly seats in 2004 without the support of the north Indian migrant. Even the heir apparent to the Sena throne, Uddhav Thackeray, realised the limitations of anti-north Indian politics and abandoned the ‘Mee Mumbaikar’ campaign before the last municipal elections.
    Raj, too, must realise the limitations of the politics of violent confrontation. As indeed must those discredited elements within the Samajwadi Party who have emerged as the self-styled spokespersons of Mumbai’s north Indians, creating a sense of ‘victimhood’ within their flock. For an overcrowded megalopolis of over 20 million people, with a rapidly crumbling infrastructure, the last thing required is a rupture in its social fabric caused by visionless political interests.
    Maybe, if Raj is interested in the future of Mumbai, he could shift his gaze from ill-advised, high-profile agitations against chhat pujas to more concrete proposals for urban renewal. The train from Gorakhpur and Patna station to Mumbai central isn’t going to stop in its tracks because a lumpen mob insists on it. What can be stopped is the political corruption that has destroyed Mumbai’s body, and now threatens its soul. Why can’t Mumbai’s leaders agree, for example, to stop regularising illegal slum colonies? Maybe, Raj is also a talented film-maker. He should consider making a film that exposes the culprits responsible for Mumbai’s decay. He might even want to get Amitabh Bachchan to act in it.

    Rajdeep Sardesai, Editor-in-Chief, CNN-IBN

    ReplyDelete
  8. Dr Heckle and Mr Pride
    Rajdeep Sardesai, Editor-in-Chief, CNN-IBN
    First Published: 22:31 IST(7/2/2008)
    Long before there was ‘monkey’, sorry, ‘maa ki...’, there was ‘bhaiya’. The 1979 Ranji game between Bombay and Delhi at the Wankhede stadium witnessed the repeated chants of ‘bhaiya’ every time Madan Lal ran in to bowl. Ironically, a year or two later, as Madan Lal bowled India to a famous win on the same ground against England, the abuse turned to celebration. In a sense, the contrast was typically Bombay: warm, embracing and cosmopolitan at one level, but unforgiving, narrow-minded, and parochial at another. Mumbai has always been a Jekyll and Hyde city with a fleeting memory span. Madan Lal realised it three decades ago. Now, Amitabh Bachchan is being confronted with the grim reality: a much-loved global superstar one day, targeted as a migrant from Uttar Pradesh the next.
    That Maharashtra Navnirman Sena leader Raj Thackeray has chosen to reveal the darker side of Mumbai in the last week should come as no surprise. For more than four decades now, Mumbai’s carefree, ‘bindaas’ spirit (best exemplified in Johnny Walker crooning on Marine Drive “Ae dil he mushkil’ in the 1950s) has wrestled with the forces of nativism and sectarian politics. In a city that prides itself on its comforting urbanism, violence and intimidation have always lurked in the shadows.
    Long before Raj discovered the north Indian as the ‘enemy within’, his uncle Bal Thackeray had already uncorked the genie of militant chauvinism onto Mumbai’s political landscape. If Raj targets the north Indian taxi driver from UP and Bihar today, 40 years ago his uncle made a mark by first attacking the shops and restaurants owned by South Indian migrants from Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. An opportunistic Thackeray Sr’s hate objects changed over the years. The Shiv Sena started off as an ‘anti-South Indian’ movement; then it took on the communists before settling on the Muslim as the ‘enemy’. If the initial years were designed to nurture the Sena as a ‘sons of the soil’ movement with a staunch Maharashtrian identity, the last 20 years have seen the Sena ‘graduate’ into the party of Hindutva politics, aimed at widening its political base beyond the local Marathi-speaking population. While evolving through its various avatars, one thing has remained unchanged: the Shiv Sena’s search for an enemy and a commitment to the politics of violence as a means to an end. Riots, bandhs and mass killings — the Sena cannot escape the charge of having Mumbai’s blood on its hands over four decades.
    To that extent, the nephew is only carrying forward the legacy of the uncle. Over four decades, Bal Thackeray has mastered the art of staying in the arclights by his seemingly outrageous rhetoric and open endorsement of violence. He has also, in the process, been built up as a larger-than-life figure; someone to be feared, reviled or admired, depending on your political preferences. Like his uncle, Raj, too, is a cartoonist, who has consciously modelled himself on the Sena supremo. The mannerisms, the sharp language, even the physical appearance, the similarities are uncanny. An ambitious, charismatic Raj, with one eye on next year’s polls, desperately wants to be like his uncle. But while Balasaheb remains a unique figure in Indian politics, Raj is in danger of being reduced to a caricature of the leader he hero-worships.
    Quite simply, Mumbai 2008 is not Bombay 1966 when the Shiv Sena was founded. In 1966, Maharashtra was still a young state, influenced by the linguistic agitation that had led to its formation. The sense of cultural pride in being a Maharashtrian was greater, as was the fear of the ‘outsider’, especially in Mumbai, a city which has been shaped by its capacity to attract people from all across the country. To that extent, the emergence of the Sena was seen by many Maharashtrians as a legitimate platform to express their grievances, especially the economic concerns stemming from increasing middle-class competition for jobs.
    Thackeray Sr became a ‘loudspeaker’ of popular grievances, someone ready to question and challenge the dominance of Mumbai’s non-Maharashtrian elites. Membership of a Sena shakha became a badge of honour, designed to compensate for the insecurity being felt in the hostile job environment.
    Forty years later, it is questionable whether the Maharashtrian middle-class feels the same sense of anger and alienation. Sure, there is a never-ending battle for Mumbai’s scarce resources, especially housing. But the ‘enemy’ isn’t so well-defined any longer. Comfortably ensconced in the new economy, the aspirations of the new generation of Maharashtrians, like most communities, are going well beyond clerical serfdom. How many middle-class Maharastrians see the UP-Bihari taxi driver as ‘competition’? how many maharashtrians actually feel threatened by the so-called ‘invasions’ of Bhojpuri culture? Ironically, Maharashtrian culture itself has almost willingly succumbed to the march of Bollywood, slowly destroying any sense of pride in tradition and language. As a result, while there is a core group — often of unemployed youth — who will be attracted to the Raj Thackeray style of machismo identity politics, the numbers aren’t large enough to make it a sustainable movement like the original Sena.
    There is also a critical demographic difference between the 60s and today. Bal Thackeray’s south Indian ‘lungiwallahs’ were barely 5-6 per cent of the city’s population, and hence were a real ‘minority’. By contrast, the 2001 census suggests that north Indian migrants comprise around 12-14 per cent of the population. The UP or Bihari migrant is no longer a marginal figure in Mumbai’s salad bowl; he is a crucial ingredient in the city’s ethos of economic interdependence.
    Politically, this has transformed Mumbai’s map. A Govinda, for example, would not have won a Lok Sabha seat from Mumbai without the staunch support of the north Indian community. The Congress-NCP alliance would not have won 19 of the city’s 34 assembly seats in 2004 without the support of the north Indian migrant. Even the heir apparent to the Sena throne, Uddhav Thackeray, realised the limitations of anti-north Indian politics and abandoned the ‘Mee Mumbaikar’ campaign before the last municipal elections.
    Raj, too, must realise the limitations of the politics of violent confrontation. As indeed must those discredited elements within the Samajwadi Party who have emerged as the self-styled spokespersons of Mumbai’s north Indians, creating a sense of ‘victimhood’ within their flock. For an overcrowded megalopolis of over 20 million people, with a rapidly crumbling infrastructure, the last thing required is a rupture in its social fabric caused by visionless political interests.
    Maybe, if Raj is interested in the future of Mumbai, he could shift his gaze from ill-advised, high-profile agitations against chhat pujas to more concrete proposals for urban renewal. The train from Gorakhpur and Patna station to Mumbai central isn’t going to stop in its tracks because a lumpen mob insists on it. What can be stopped is the political corruption that has destroyed Mumbai’s body, and now threatens its soul. Why can’t Mumbai’s leaders agree, for example, to stop regularising illegal slum colonies? Maybe, Raj is also a talented film-maker. He should consider making a film that exposes the culprits responsible for Mumbai’s decay. He might even want to get Amitabh Bachchan to act in it.

    Rajdeep Sardesai, Editor-in-Chief, CNN-IBN

    ReplyDelete
  9. In this Global era entire world and people are much closer and there is no boundry of language, Country,Gender etc.We are chating talking the people of all different culture.Now a days Indian are dominating In US ,UK etc.What will happen when they will choose the Raj Thakre Path and Start throwing the Indians?
    Then What will be indian economic growth etc.
    Mr. Raj Thakre should understand these basic that every person should compete the rest of the world.
    North inddian are able to compete themselve with Maharastrian people ,South Indian people and in fact any where in the world.

    They are such a Confident that they can survive on moon also.

    Opposite to this young generation of Middle class Marathi are just Gutka chaap and not able to compete.Whatever they are is due to goverment reservation policy in all the colleges etc.I m saying this bcaz i was in nagpur for 5 yrs and i know the the middle class mentality of them.

    Mr. Raj Thakre is also of same mankind.

    Another thing is that i request to Bihar and UP goverment to anounce all the north indian to comeback to their respective state for a month.Then imagine the situation.Everything will be collapsed wherther it is IT industry,Automobile or even local Subzi Mundi.

    ReplyDelete
  10. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  11. hello Indians,
    i was born and brought up in mumbai but i consider myself as an INDIAN rather than any other caste. This is 21st century our country is developing and political parties like MNS & Shiv Sena are focusing more on castesim rathar than progress. what will Raj thakre will get from driving away 'bhaiyas' from maharashtra, when he was in Shiv Sena they were against Muslims now they are against Biharis , which caste will be next they only know about this.

    Raj says bhaiyas are criminals , what can he say about himself,or his uncle Bal Thakre,what about Chaggan Bhujbal and Sharad pawar who are are in Tlgi scam case, Narayan Rane who was ex don of Chembure what about Chotta Rajan whose real name is Rajan Sadashiv Nikhalje , a maharashtrian, and every one knows that all these politicians are criminals.
    in todays world if people cannot cooperate with each other then there wont be any progress.

    Raj prefers to speak in marathi and gives his comments to marathi newspapers. he says if u cannot speak in marathi then you can leave maharashtra. ho the hell is he decide all this,Firstly eveyone has rights to speak in their own language or even hindi . if Raj has problem in speaking in Hindi then i think he should be kicked out from India. because prior to mumbai or maharashtra we stay in INDIA.
    Is Raj trying to make his own country ?

    ReplyDelete
  12. i think raj thakre is a kind of terrorist.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Hello friends,
    The steps that is followed by raj thakre is only for the vote.he want to go in government.They have scarcity of topic so he choose this topic.Mumbai is the business capital of india and this is responsibility to all indians to think good about there.There is right in our constitution for all indian to live any part of india and work there.who is raj thakre to go against constitution.if bihari hat maharasra and maharastra hat bihari then how can we drive a big country like india.There should be thinking of help to each other state,not hat.

    ReplyDelete
  14. so if mr raj is doing correct then all maraathi's also have to come back to mumbai or maharashtra who are working other parts in India.Is it wht mr Raj wants?it will be better for us esp. media persons,not to promote or show any bites of tht anti social elements..
    asmita

    ReplyDelete
  15. I have recently come to maharashtra to work for a IT company here.
    I have started feeling that the situation here can turn bad as raj thakre has a strong support here, and marathis love him.
    I cannot blame them completely because they demand respect and hold there individuality in their own state and disallow outsiders to be a pain for them. I mean because of the faliure in some other region in the country why should they suffer. So looking from their perspective it is understandable and what natural human tendency is.

    But in this process the image of maharashra is getting destroyed and it wont be a very attractive destination for professionals from various sectors in the future to come here and make their living.
    So in my idea people should be a bit more tolerant and help their fellow countrymen to make their living and live peacefuly.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I am maharastrian working out of india for 4 yeras.

    mumbai is now take over by bhayas madrasi and gujarati. so there is no any place for maharastrian (the locals)to live peacefully.
    I have seen in out of india the respect for the locals here .all those who are out of this city respect all locals .
    I mumbai there is oppsite ,all maharastrian are in big trouble because of outsiders. and they want to dominate maharastrian peoples.

    When I will come mumbai I will support raj saheb thakre.

    ReplyDelete
  17. there is no need to feel asemed of being marathi. persns who are saying that they can compete anybody should try this in their own states . they come here because their government is so irresponsible that it couldnt even handle their local people. if anybody is living here HE MUST RESPECT THE GREATE CULTURE AND LANGUAGE OF MAHARASHTRA. atleast you should respect the soil on which you are living.And why eerybody is so cocerned about maharashtra?? you go to south india and try your NORTH-INDIAN ATTITUDE ther;they will throw you out.
    its the greatness of maharashtra people that this doent happen here. so be thankful to us.in karnataka.kerala,andra ,begal people are still so proud of there laguages. different languages and cultures are heritage of india and respective persons should preserve it. raj is just trying to do the same and is certainly more talented and responsible than ANY up or bihari minister!!! jai maharashtra

    ReplyDelete
  18. excuse me! why are maharashtriyans are so disturbed by the influx of people and the irresponsible ministers that north Indians have? who will explain why has mumbai failed to expand its boundaries and accomodate everyone coming in? how much and what the maharashtrian ministers have done to solve the problems that mumbai faces, delhi is expanding limits ....look at the way NCR has come up... the nearby areas of delhi which were waste few years ago are hubs of industry now and people from all over the country come and live and there is no space crunch.
    and by the way if mumbai walas are so proud of being maharashtrian as to call other state's people "refugee" in their state, then go ahead develop your own army, your own scientific force, industrialists,electricty, water, labor force. mind you, in doing something there is no reservation, do it if u have the courage to do it, do it all alone without any UP or Bihar wala...no body comes and stops you to go to rajasthan and start a venture...come on! do it Maharatrians....

    ReplyDelete
  19. @Sachin: you are insensitive ignorant dumb fuck.

    the fact is since 99% of maharashtrians have never traveled out of Maharashtra including yourself, raj and bal thakre and al his men, you dont have the perspective to understand other cultures.

    Its common knowledge that maharashtrians are the least aware of what is happening in India.

    People in north refer to each other as bhai saab or bhaiya as a mark of respect, marathis have made it a derogatory term, heck you call your own local people ghatis, thats what marathi culture has come out to be.


    Marathis like you always lacked the national perspective because like frogs of a pond you have never moved out and tried to have a broader perspective, now Raj thakre who himself has never moved out of Maharastra is inciting this hatred.
    Does that man even have a perspective required to be a leader?

    If you are going to be led by raj thakres and uddhav thakres then god bless you.


    We as north indians dont expect local marathis to understand us, you cant because you have never thought of anything beyond maharastra. All we want is live and let live.

    By the way the Mumbai that you people like to call all yours, was part of gujrat before it was made part of Maharastra for some weird reason only congress knows and gujratis, britishers and parsis built it.
    We can only imagine if Mumbai would be any better than latur or vidharba if marathi politicians ruled it always.

    Tell us one great leader maharashtra has given us? Ok one great scientist or businessmen?

    While the common marathis became poorer and poorer marathis politicians like vilas rao, shinde, pawar are the richest politicians in the country.


    You just got lucky with it. How many cities have maharashtrians built to claim it as theirs?

    Pune got built because of army base. Mumbai was built by parsis and britishers and later gujratis and marwadis.

    Ths building you live in was built by bihari labours, why live in it? Why dont marathis labours work there, has the government banned them?

    The fact is most marathis dont want to struggle, either they are happy sending their wives to work somewhere as a house maid while they spend their time drinking, beating their kids or rioting for thakres.

    They woudl rather kill a labourer earing 40 rs a day to feed his family by attacking them in a group but not work.

    Heck these guys are such cowards they dont even attack alone, atleast rahul raj dared to come along alone.

    Mumbai recieves far greater grant from north than any other city, why should central government give such grants to a state that is already developed?

    Because you idiot, Mumbai is a Indian city, not a marathi city.
    Government realises it cant develop all places equally so it assumes people will come their to seek work.


    Stop fooling yourself. India does not have enough money to build all states and make them job hubs.

    If jobs are in Mumbai, people will flock to Mumbai, if you cant take it move out.

    Maharastra is the only state where people refer to itself as "Jai maharastra" most times before "Jai hind". No where else we say jai delhi, or jai bihar or jai MP.

    What is so great about Maharastra? The fact that people here crib about jobs being taken by people from states where students dont get electricity, education, food?
    Are you guys this incompetent?

    Maharastra is still far better off in amenities, and if u cant compete with a guy from bihar who has no support from government at all, then stop refering your self as jai maharastra, yopu are just the most incompetent bunch of people ever.


    And dont think north indians can not pick arms, its only a matter of time when these MNS guys are picked up and shot in the head by regular north Indians.

    I am not against marathis, i just think they lack a wider perspective even after they get a level of education.

    If you are so scared from competition, might as well bcome a sadhu and leave for himalayas.

    If you cant tolerate a person from UP, Bihar stop praying to Ram and Krishna as they were both born in north.

    Get a perspective. Think beyond yourself. Stop being fuckin small its 21st century for gods sake.

    -
    A
    www.lucky-six.blogspot.com

    PS: Satya approve kar dena ye post dost please inspite of some abusive words here n der.

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  20. For All the NON Maharashtrians!

    We are the most tolerant and peace loving community and so we always welcomed and also sustained some communities who populated our state with open arms. Today, when we ask for our rights to be recognised before all the Non Maharashtrians, you do not want to support us? Why? Go to any city in Maharashtra and we have all or either every community leaving for years. But there is a limit of loads n loads of people coming to Mumbai or Pune. If they come-is their any wrong in learning or respecting us? What does Bihari's do? Hawkers...taxi or Riksha or some other small time business. Hawkers cause more traffic congestion with growing multi nationals all small time businesses of Gujrathi;s or Marwari;s are also going to be history in next 5 to 10 years. We need to understand and respect the origin of every state. Maharashtra is termed as 'Land of Immigrants' and not of Maharashtrians by non Maharashtrians as they feel ashamed to link to Maharashtrians. Do you think this is justifiable? We all are given a State and allowed to work everywhere in India but do we go to other states and refrain from accepting their identity? In Mumbai as people have come for years in huge numbers from outside they have started forming clustured communities and distancing from the state identity that is 'Maharashtra' which belongs to Marathi people. What is wrong if we insists on Marathi or giving us priority in jobs. Average Maharashtrian house has an Engineer, a techie or a Doctor or a CA. We are educated people and will sooner or later be out of a image of petty thinking Maharashtrians who cannot do Business as Multinationals are taking over and one who are educated get to heights in MNS. The CEO of Citigroup sitting in New York is a Maharashtrian and we have many more examples so please stop giving slogans against us. Rather look at future and try to make India as a better country and accept the identity of each state and importance if you do that we welcome you.

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  21. मैं राज ठाकरे जी से पूछना चाहता हूँ कहाँ गया उनका महाराष्ट्र प्रेम क्यों उन्होंने अपने कार्यकर्ताओं का आह्वाहन नही किया इन आतंकवादियों को मुंबई से भागने मैं. क्या केवल अपने देश के लोगों से ही दुश्मनी निभाना पसंद है ठाकरे साहब. या फ़िर मान लिया जाय की आप यह सब कुछ केवल राजनीतिक स्वार्थ के लिए कर रहे थे. जागो ठाकरे साहब आपका महाराष्ट्र आपको बुला रहा है. कुछ सेवा हो जाए. क्यों न इन आतकवादियों को महाराष्ट्र से निकाल के बाहर किया जाए . आख़िर कब तक मुंबई इस तरह के हमले सहती रहेगी.


    जीतेन्द्र कुमार तिवारी
    इटावा (उत्तर प्रदेश )

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  22. Ranjit patil-firstly i would like to say i m Maharashtrian & asking to other state peoples that why u interested in maharashtra matter?We r able to solve that prblm.My support is to Raj saheb.If u live in mumbai or maharashtra u have to speak in marathi otherwise u can leave the maharashtra.Shivaji maharaj ladhle te marathi sathi.Tyanni aplya jivanacha tyag kela te fact marathisathi ani apan kay kartoy.Mhanun maharashtrian lokano utha ani saglyanna marathi bolayla lava."Jay maharashtra!"

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  23. Akash:--Hi Ranjit what do u know about your leader Raj Thakre. for your kind information I would like to tell you, Raj's son who study in a English school and learning French language. Finally there is no any matter "Bhaiya" or "Marathi" only Raj want to be popular and say you people to speak Marathi and drive Rickshaw and Taxi.Please try to understand his motive my brother..

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  24. nice piece of information, I had come to know about your internet site from my friend vinay, delhi,i have read atleast 12 posts of yours by now, and let me tell you, your website gives the best and the most interesting information. This is just the kind of information that i had been looking for, i'm already your rss reader now and i would regularly watch out for the new post, once again hats off to you! Thanx a ton once again, Regards, Raj Thackeray images

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